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Guanajuato Mummies

Guanajuato, Mexico is known for its mummies. It is a dry area (although I’ve been caught in a few rain storms in Guanajuato), and there are natural chemicals in the ground which allow for a quick mummification process. The mummies you can find in the museum (El museo de las momias) are all modern mummies. I don’t think the oldest mummy is more than about a hundred years old even though no new ones have been dug up in over 50 years.

The mummy museum of Guanajuato features the world’s smallest mummy (on the right). The baby mummy pictured above, and its mother, died during the birthing process. It looks fairly large in this picture, but in real life it is only a few inches in height.

Ever heard of dying with your boots on? The guy in the above photo didn’t quite meet that saying, but he did die with his socks on, and they haven’t moved ever since.

5 Responses to “Guanajuato Mummies”

  1. 1
    jake:

    Hi…. I’ve reciprocated with a link 🙂

  2. 2
    viri:

    omg this is great..i luv the picture the mummie with the socks on….it was really fun…. and the scariest one the little kid …hope there are more pictures next time..i luv this website…i8 want to go to guanajuato… i reccomend you guys to go to guanajuato..so u don’t have to go all the the way to egypto…..fun….

  3. 3
    robert amsterdam:

    I object to the “funny” comment by the webmaster that go with these eartly remains of people who died.

    It is a disgrace to comment on them in these words – I find it very rude to publish them like this.

    Please do note: a mother died together with her baby while giving birth, this is: coming to this earth. To breath!

    And about these sock: I even wouldn’t like to see photos of you breathing people with your whole body covered in your socks, clean, nor dirty!

    No, I am not a fundamentalist, neither a zelot or a puritan. I am an art historian from Amsterdam, The Netherlands, with respect for the past – I hope.

    I look foward to your messures. Robert

  4. 4
    Mily Rodriguez:

    This is very intresting.
    i would like to see more mummy pictures.
    am very curious

  5. 5
    Vero:

    Hey Robert Amsterdam, I think you’re being quite rude, I don’t know if you are really from Amsterdam or if it’s just your nickname, but let me tell you something, it’s not that we Mexicans have no respect for the dead, on the contrary, the Mexican celebration “Día de Muertos” (November 2nd) is known worldwide, and if we have a special day, a holiday, in which to remember our dear ones that have passed away, believe me, it is not to laugh at them!

    It’s kind of cultural, we have lots of traditions about death. What would you do if someone gave you a chocolate skull with your name on it? Would you think it as irrespectful? Well, on Nov 2nd, it’s quite common that people do that, part of our culture.

    And this has a lot to do with the mummies, they were found, not made. And since Mexicans like stories and tales, in the museum they have at least one for each mummy -I don’t remember how many there are- and tales about “the mummy with the socks” are the ones you’d listen to there. There is another story about a mummy whose hair still grows! XD…and of course we do not think it is irrespectful.

    Perhaps the way the webmaster posted it wasn’t the best, but I totally recommend you, if ever, you have the chance to go to Guanajuato, don’t miss it! It’s a fantastic place, and the mummies’ museum is just one of lots of attractions. I don’t know what your specialty in history is, just for you to know, Guanajuato is the place where the Mexican Independence started to become a fact.

    And please, don’t take it personal, I didn’t though my family is from Guanajuato and I’ve been there a thousand times. I really think it’s just different ways of thinking, different cultures and traditions.

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